Last updated February 26, 2019


Glossary

Ajax

A web technology used to exchange data with a server to dynamically update parts of a web page (for example, forms) without needing entire page reloads.

Alias

A user-friendly name to replace the internal path that the system assigns to a URL on the site. For example, you might assign an alias of /about to the About page on your site, to replace the internal path /node/5. This would give the page a URL of http://example.com/about instead of http://example.com/node/5. See Section 5.1, “Concept: Paths, Aliases, and URLs” for more information.

Anonymous

A person (user) interacting with the site who is not logged in. See Section 7.1, “Concept: Users, Roles, and Permissions” for more information.

Block

A chunk of content (text, images, links, etc.) that can be displayed on a page of a site. Blocks are displayed in regions. See Section 8.1, “Concept: Blocks” for more information.

Breakpoint

Breakpoints are used to separate the height or width of browser screens, printers, and other media output types into steps. A responsive site adjusts its presentation at these breakpoints. See Section 6.14, “Concept: Responsive Image Styles” for more information.

Bundle

Synonym for Entity subtype.

Cache

The site’s internal cache stores the output of time-consuming calculations, such as computing output for an HTML page request, and then retrieves them instead of recalculating the next time they are needed. External caching systems can also be used on the web server to speed up a site’s response. See Section 12.1, “Concept: Cache” for more information on the internal cache.

CMS

Acronym for Content Management System.

Configuration

Information about your site that is not content, and is meant to be more permanent than state information, such as the name of your site, the content types and views you have defined, etc. See Section 1.5, “Concept: Types of Data” for more information.

Content

Information meant to be displayed on your site, such as text, images, downloads, etc. See also Configuration and State. See Section 1.5, “Concept: Types of Data” for more information.

Content item

An item of content that is typically meant to be displayed as the main content of a page on your site. This is an entity type. See Section 2.3, “Concept: Content Entities and Fields” for more information.

Content Management System (CMS)

A collection of tools designed to allow the creation, modification, organization, search, retrieval and removal of information on a website. See Section 1.1, “Concept: Drupal as a Content Management System” for more information.

Content type

An entity subtype for the content item entity type. Each content type is used for some particular purpose on the site, and each has its own fields. For example, a site for a farmers market might have a content type for simple pages, and another for a vendor listing page. See Section 2.3, “Concept: Content Entities and Fields” for more information.

Contextual link

A link to an administrative page for editing or configuring a feature of the site, shown in the context where that feature is displayed. Example: a link to configure a menu that is shown when you hover your mouse over the menu. See Section 4.1, “Concept: Administrative Overview” for more information.

Contributed

Modules, themes, and distributions that are not part of the Drupal core download, and that can be downloaded separately from the Drupal.org website.

Cron

On some operating systems, cron is a command scheduler application that executes commands or scripts periodically. Your site defines periodic tasks, also known as cron tasks, that need to be triggered either by an operating system cron scheduler, or internally. See Section 13.1, “Concept: Cron” for more information.

Distribution

A single download that provides a shortcut for setting up a specific type of site, such as a website for a club or for e-commerce. A distribution contains Drupal core, along with contributed modules and/or themes; many distributions also pre-configure the site or even create sample content upon installation. See Section 1.4, “Concept: Distributions” for more information.

Drupal core

The files, themes, profiles, and modules included with the standard project software download. See Section 1.1, “Concept: Drupal as a Content Management System” for more information.

Entity

An item of either content or configuration data, although in common usage, the term often refers to content entities. Examples include content items, custom blocks, taxonomy terms, and definitions of content types; the first three are content entities, and the last is a configuration entity. See also Entity type, Entity subtype, and Field. See Section 2.3, “Concept: Content Entities and Fields” for more information.

Entity subtype

Within a content entity type, a grouping of entities that share the same fields. For example, within the content item entity type, a farmers market site might have subtypes (known as content types) for static pages and vendor pages, each with its own group of fields. You may also see the term bundle used (especially in programmer documentation) as a synonym of entity subtype. See Section 2.3, “Concept: Content Entities and Fields” for more information.

Entity type

The overall type of an entity; in common usage, it is only applied to a content entity. Examples include content types, taxonomy terms, and custom blocks. See Section 2.3, “Concept: Content Entities and Fields” for more information.

Field

Data of a certain type that is attached to a content entity. For instance, on a farmers market site’s vendor content type, you might have fields for an image, the vendor description, and a taxonomy term. See Section 2.3, “Concept: Content Entities and Fields” for more information.

Field bundle

Synonym for Entity subtype.

Field formatter

Configuration that defines how the data in a field is displayed. For example, a text field could be displayed with a prefix and/or suffix, and it could have its HTML tags stripped out or limited. See also View mode and Field widget. See Section 6.10, “Concept: View Modes and Formatters” for more information.

Field widget

Configuration that defines how someone can enter or edit data for a field on a data entry form. For example, a text field could use a single-line or multi-line entry box, and there could be a setting for the size of the box. See also Field formatter. See Section 6.8, “Concept: Forms and Widgets” for more information.

Formatter

See Field formatter.

FOSS

Acronym for Free and Open Source Software, meaning software that is developed by a community of people and released under a non-commercial license. See also GPL. See Section 1.6, “Concept: The Drupal Project” for more information.

GPL

Acronym for the GNU General Public License, a non-commercial software license. All software downloaded from the Drupal.org website is licensed under the "GNU General Public License, version 2". See also FOSS. See Section 1.7, “Concept: Drupal Licensing” for more information.

Image style

A set of processing steps that transform a base image into a new image; typical processing includes scaling and cropping. See Section 6.12, “Concept: Image Styles” for more information.

LAMP

Acronym for Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP: the software on the web server that the scripts commonly run on (although it can use other operating systems, web servers, and databases). See Section 3.1, “Concept: Server Requirements” for more information.

Log

A list of recorded events on the site, such as usage data, performance data, errors, warnings, and operational information. See Section 12.4, “Concept: Log” for more information.

Menu

A set of links used for navigation on a site, which may be arranged in a hierarchy. See Section 5.6, “Concept: Menu” for more information.

Module

Software (usually PHP, JavaScript, and/or CSS) that extends site features and adds functionality. The Drupal project distinguishes between core and contributed modules. See Section 1.2, “Concept: Modules” for more information.

Path

The unique, last part of the internal URL that the system assigns to a page on the site, which can be a visitor-facing page or an administrative page. For example, the internal URL for the About page on your site might be http://example.com/node/5, and in this case, the path is node/5. See also Alias. See Section 5.1, “Concept: Paths, Aliases, and URLs” for more information.

Permission

The ability to perform some action on the site, such as editing a particular type of content, or viewing user profiles. See also Role. See Section 7.1, “Concept: Users, Roles, and Permissions” for more information.

Reference field

A field that represents a relationship between an entity and one or more other entities, which may be the same entity type or a different type. For example, on a farmers market site, a recipe content item might have a reference field to the vendor (also a content item) that posted the recipe. Taxonomy term fields are also reference fields. See Section 6.4, “Concept: Reference Fields” for more information.

Region

A defined area of a page where content can be placed, such as the header, footer, main content area, left sidebar, etc. Regions are defined by themes, and the content displayed in each region is contained in blocks. See Section 2.1, “Concept: Regions in a Theme” for more information.

Responsive

A site or theme is said to be responsive if it adjusts its presentation in response to the size of the browser screen, printer, or other media output type. See also Breakpoint. See Section 6.14, “Concept: Responsive Image Styles” for more information.

Revision

A record of the past or present state of a content entity, as it is edited over time. See Section 2.6, “Concept: Editorial Workflow” for more information.

Role

A named set of permissions that can be applied to a user account. See Section 7.1, “Concept: Users, Roles, and Permissions” for more information.

Security update

An update that fixes a security-related bug, such as a hacking vulnerability. See Section 13.3, “Concept: Security and Regular Updates” for more information.

State

Information of a temporary nature about the current state of your site, such as the time when cron was last run, etc. See also Content and Configuration. See Section 1.5, “Concept: Types of Data” for more information.

Taxonomy

The process of classifying content. See Section 6.5, “Concept: Taxonomy” for more information.

Taxonomy term

A term used to classify content, such as a tag or a category. See also Vocabulary. See Section 6.5, “Concept: Taxonomy” for more information.

Text format

Configuration that defines the processing that happens to user-entered text before it is shown in the browser. This might include stripping or limiting HTML tags, or turning URLs into links. See Section 6.15, “Concept: Text Formats and Editors” for more information.

Theme

Software and asset files (images, CSS, PHP code, and/or templates) that determine the style and layout of the site. The Drupal project distinguishes between core and contributed themes. See Section 1.3, “Concept: Themes” for more information.

UI

Acronym for User Interface.

Update

A newer version of your site’s software, either Drupal core or a module or theme. See also Security update. See Section 13.3, “Concept: Security and Regular Updates” for more information.

User

A person interacting with the site, either logged-in or anonymous. See Section 7.1, “Concept: Users, Roles, and Permissions” for more information.

User interface

The text, styles, and images that are visible on a site, separated logically into the user interface for site visitors and the administrative user interface.

User one (User 1)

The initial user account that is created when you install the site (whose ID number is 1). It automatically has all permissions, even if it is not assigned an administrative role. See Section 7.2, “Concept: The User 1 Account” for more information.

View

A formatted listing of data; typically, the data comes from content entities. For example, on a farmers market site, you might create a content item for each vendor. You could then make view that generates a listing page that shows a thumbnail image and short description of each vendor, linking to the full-page content item. Using the same data, you could also make a view that generates a new vendors block, which would show information from the most recently added vendors. See Section 2.4, “Concept: Modular Content” for more information.

View mode

A set of field formatter configuration for all of the fields of a content entity, some of which may be hidden. Each entity subtype can have one or more view modes defined; for example, content types typically have Full and Teaser view modes, where the Teaser view mode displays fewer or trimmed-down fields. See Section 6.10, “Concept: View Modes and Formatters” for more information.

Vocabulary

A group of taxonomy terms to choose from when classifying content in a particular way, such as the list of all of the vendor categories on a farmers market site. Technically, vocabularies are the entity subtype for the taxonomy term entity type. See Section 6.5, “Concept: Taxonomy” for more information.

Widget

See Field widget.

Wizard

A web form that allows you to fill in a few values, and creates something with sensible defaults based on the values you chose. For example, there are wizards for creating views of different types. See Section 9.3, “Creating a Content List View” for more information.

WYSIWYG

Acronym for What You See is What You Get, meaning a method for editing content where what you see on the editing screen closely resembles the final product. See Section 6.16, “Configuring Text Formats and Editors” for more information.